Code verbosity is one of those topics that everyone has an opinion on — and mine will probably differ from yours. One of my particular quirks is that I like my code to fit in 80 columns wherever possible (or 132 on some codebases). It’s just one of those things.

The C++11 enum class concept, as nice as it is, can increase the verbosity of your code. It’s a fine balance to get the right level, and in large switch statements for example, enum class values can get very annoying.

Enter the C++11 version of the using statement, and you can clean this up fairly easily…

I have an older iMac in my kitchen with a keyboard that’s on its last legs. Some of the keys don’t even work anymore, and it’s an exercise in frustration to use. This evening I tried to plug in an older aluminum keyboard, and it didn’t work. The caps lock key wouldn’t even light up.

You’ll never believe the fix for this keyboard!

(See? You too can write clickbait headlines!)

I’m mainly looking at OpenHAB for support of the advanced functionality in the HomeSeer HS-WD100+ in-wall dimmers. Specifically, they have multi-tap functionality supporting four commands in addition to the generic On/Off function. For example, my pool light switch is out by the shed; wouldn’t be nice if I could just double-tap the switch at the back door instead?

Here’s one way of making it work in OpenHAB 2…

I’m in the process of evaluating alternative solutions to the Wink (I really want the Central Scene functionality for the HomeSeer Switches!). After a brief foray into HomeAssistant (which doesn’t support it either), I decided to try OpenHAB 2. It’s early in that process, but so far it looks promising.

Unfortunately, ESXi has an issue or three with USB passthrough support.